Tennessee
Public Project FAQs

It’s easy to file and manage your Tennessee bond claims with zlien, the industry’s only all-in-one bond claim and security rights management platform. Get complete control over your bond claim rights on a state, county, or municipal project, by using intelligent technology. To learn more about Tennessee’s bond claim laws and requirements, read the frequently asked questions below.

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Tennessee

Preliminary Notice Deadlines
None / not applicable.

Tennessee

Bond Claim Deadlines
None / not applicable.

Tennessee

Preliminary Notice Deadlines
None / not applicable.

Tennessee

Bond Claim Deadlines
90 Days

Bond claim after last furnishing, but within 90 days of project completion.

Tennessee

Preliminary Notice Deadlines
None / not applicable.

Tennessee

Bond Claim Deadlines
90 Days

Bond claim after last furnishing, but within 90 days of project completion.

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Tennessee Frequently Asked Questions

Tennessee Bond Claim FAQs

In Tennessee, all parties who furnish labor and/or materials to the general, or to first or second-tier subcontractors, are entitled to make a bond claim. Suppliers to suppliers are not protected. Land surveyors, architects, and engineers, however, are entitled to make a bond claim in Tennessee. Further, if the claimant receives written notice of non-responsibility from the contractor via certified mail return receipt, any claim is limited to labor and/or materials furnished prior to receiving the notice of non-responsibility.

In Tennessee, a bond claim must be received after the claimant’s last furnishing of labor and/or materials to the project, but within 90 days after the completion of the project as a whole.

Tennessee law provides that a bond claim should be provided to either the contractor supplying the bond, or to public official in charge of letting or awarding the contract. Best practice, however, would be to provide notice of the claim to both the general contractor and to the public entity. If the public official in charge of awarding the contract is unknown, the mayor can be served for a city project, the county executive may be served for a county project, and the governor may be served for a state project.

A suit to enforce a bond claim in Tennessee must be initiated within 6 months of the completion of the public work, or the claimant’s last furnishing of labor and/or materials. Unfortunately, the statutes are silent as to whether it is the earlier or later of the two periods that applies. Best practice, then, would be to err on the side of caution and assume it is the shorter of the two periods.

In Tennessee, a bond claim must include a description of the labor and/or materials furnished, an itemized account of the labor and/or materials furnished, a description of the property improved, and the balance due.

A bond claim in Tennessee must be delivered by certified mail return receipt requested, or by personal delivery.

Tennessee Public Project Preliminary Notice FAQs

Generally no. Tennessee does not specifically require preliminary notice to be given on state projects, however, obtaining a copy of the bond is generally advisable to make sure that there are no notice requirements set forth by the bond itself on that specific project. This is especially true if the contracting public entity is a city, county, or other public entity that is not the state.

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