My Favorite Resource on New York Mechanic Lien Laws

People frequently ask me where I find the information to keep this blog. Unfortunately, there’s no simple answer. Mechanic lien law changes are proposed and put into effect around the country pretty constantly, and lien cases get decided by courts at least once every two or three weeks. There’s no central respitoray where all these updates are posted.

Over the past five years or so, however, I’ve created a storehouse of resources I use to get information about mechanic lien laws across the country. I’ve decided to start sharing them here on the Construction Lien Blog. While many of our readers are concerned about lien laws across the nation, others really have a narrow focus and are interested in only a single state’s laws. Some of these sources may be very helpful to those readers.

I’m going to start with lien law in New York, and one of my favorite resources on the web.

If you’re looking for a great resource on mechanic lien laws in New York, look no further than Vincent Pallaci’s New York Mechanic’s Lien blog. I’ve used his blog as a reference for a number of posts about New York mechanic lien laws, but his blog contains a wealth of information about the particulars of the state’s laws that my blog never has time to consider.

Another feature of his blog helpful to folks supplying materials or labor to New York projects is the simple no-frills “Frequently Asked Question” page, which answers such basic questions of “How long do I have to file a mechanics lien?” and “what is the fee to file a mechanic’s lien?”  The FAQ Page is accessible here.

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Scott Wolfe Jr

About Scott Wolfe Jr

Scott Wolfe Jr. is the CEO of zlien, a company that provides software and services to help building material supply and construction companies reduce their credit risk and default receivables through the management of mechanics lien and bond claim compliance. He is also the founding author of The Lien and Credit Journal, a leading online publication about liens, security instruments and getting paid on every account. Scott is a licensed attorney in six states with extensive experience in corporate credit management and collections law, with a specific emphasis on utilizing mechanic liens, UCC filings and other security instruments to protect and manage receivables. You can connect with him via Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+.
  • http://www.rmkb.com Anthony

    Can someone file a claim in NY against someone’s property or business for professional servies rendered that do NOT relate to the property (i.e., for unpaid dental bill/surgery)?

    • http://www.zlien.com Scott Wolfe Jr

      Hi Anthony – thanks for the comment. Each state has a laundry list of liens that they allow on all sorts of things – cars, real estate, vessels, personal items, etc. – some states even allow liens to be filed against farm animals. However, I don’t know whether a lien can be filed in NY for personal services like dental or medical bills.

      Traditionally, lien laws are written to allow folks to lien some item that is involved with the debt. So, someone who works on a car can lien that car. Landlords can lien tenant possessions. Contractors can lien the construction project. A jeweler can lien the jewelry he worked on, etc.

      It would be a bit unorthodox for a state to have a law that allows a dentist to lien something unrelated to the service he provided (i.e. a tv, or personal items at someone’s home)…b/c there’s not connection between the service and the lien. With that said, I do know there are medical liens in a lot of different states whereby medical providers can file a lien against a lawsuit when the person’s injuries (that required treatment) is at issue. Again, there’s a connection between the lien and the services provided. And insofar as professional services are concerned, lawyers can lien any ongoing litigation for unpaid legal fees in most states.

      Hope that helps.